Keep remote learning simple 2: Taking a Break

I was encouraged by the response to my last blog post. Teachers want to keep their remote teaching simple for themselves as much as for their students. More students will be able to access your materials if you keep them simple.

Lyoncapavril20

The example that I want to share with you this time is a week-long set of lessons about taking a break. I have included two videos, one is a kids’ cartoon and the other is a children’s book, and then there are three infographics. This lesson is for Intermediate Low learners of French. The theme of the lessons, taking a break, has a strong Social Emotional component which is relevant as we are finishing up the school year during the Coronavirus pandemic and need to practice self-care.

If these lessons would work for your students, I suggest that you post this set of lessons to your students on the School Management system that they use, giving each student their own copy. The students will fill out the responses on the slides and submit them back to you for feedback.

These lessons are self contained and don’t rely on external apps or technology tools, yet if you know that your students are comfortable with some technology, I have a few options for you. You can use EdPuzzle for the cartoon and a Google form to present the video of the children’s book. Yet another idea is that you could make a Quizlet vocabulary quiz using the vocabulary phrases that I gave when I asked students to make their own dictionaries. I think that those are three ways that technology could marginally enhance the lesson.

In addition, I want to show you how you could use Flipgrid and give some hints on how to do some live teaching with this lesson. One way to use Flipgrid is as a daily message to greet your students, briefly present the material you are teaching and then ask the students a question that they will respond to by sending back a video to you. For this lesson specifically one of your Flip Grids could be about how you take a break, using the vocabulary that is introduced in the lessons, and then ask students how they take a break. In your live teaching segment, you could put students in breakout groups to ask and answer the questions of the interview and then you could have a chance to ask students the questions in the class discussion slides. Alternatively, you could go over all the slides with students during your live teaching segment.

Again, I want to encourage you to use these slides just as they are, without the added technology, keeping your remote learning teaching as simple as possible, again both for you and for your students.

Here is the set of slides for Lessons on Taking a Break

Examples:
EdPuzzle of Bernie & Corneil Cartoon
Google Form of video of Children’s Book Rien du tout

Resources:
Questions for Rien du Tout

Simple remote learning lessons for French class

In the move to remote learning this Spring of 2020, it is tough to make lessons equitable when some students may experience technology and connectivity issues. In this blog post I want to show an example of how to keep lessons simple. I will share with you a low-tech yet online solution for providing students with lessons for a week.

My example is a set of slides on Google Drive that serves as lessons that students can work on independently. While the lessons include links to video clips, everything the students have to do is contained in the slides. There aren’t any exterior apps that are used and therefore difficulty remembering usernames and passwords or issues with returning work to the teacher.

You can give each student their own set of these slides by posting to your school management system. They write their answers to the questions right into their own copy of the slides and return them to you in the school management system.

By supplying you with an example of a week of lessons, you can then adapt it to use the technology that you know your students can handle. For example, you can take the videos and post them to EdPuzzle or Fluentkey and make the questions a quiz. You can ask the questions in the lessons on Flipgrid or Voicethread and have students post back to you videos of their answers. You can take my vocabulary list and make a Quizlet out of it so that students can quiz themselves on the vocabulary before doing the activities. Or, with this content, you can have your students respond through a Google Form or a quiz on Canvas. It is my hope that you make this your own but that you also consider using my low-tech version so that it is as simple as possible for your students.

In addition, this lesson has possibilities for live teaching, if that is available to you. The discussion questions that I ask can be questions that students ask and answer. If you use Zoom, you can create breakout groups of four and ask students to ask each other the questions. And, when you come back together into the large group, students can complete a Zoom poll to reflect on their use of the target language. Another option is if you run a live class you can share your screen and go over the slides with the students.

Here is a link on Google Drive to the lessons made around the opening sequence of the film Avril et le Monde Truqué. The theme of these lessons is Science and Innovation. I hope you will find them useful.

I would love to post another set of lessons for you in the near future. To that end, please tell me in the comments what works for you and what would be helpful changes. Thank you.

Resources for the lessons:
French Review Article
Canberra Alliance Française Packet for the Film
Images from the Film

Dear Subscribers,

Thank you for following this blog over the years. I have decided to add to my online presence as World Language Toolbox, wanting to offer support to teachers of all languages, not only French.

To that end, I have created a Twitter handle @WldLangToolbox. And, my new YouTube channel World Language Toolbox can be found at http://bit.ly/WLToolbox.

On my channel you will find videos to train World Language teachers like you in practical tools you can use tomorrow in your classroom. The resources are always free with no strings attached. My next video is called In 15 minutes learn to promote Intercultural Competence through Picture Books and I think it will be powerful as I articulate the relationship between teaching language and culture.

I would love to have you follow my channel on YouTube. Once I reach 100 subscribers, I will be able to have the name of my channel in the URL. Would you please help me get there?

Best,
Mme Moghtader

In 20 minutes, learn to incorporate music in language instruction

There has been great response to my first two videos in this series, “Learn to… in 20 minutes”. Allow me to explain my perspective. World Language teachers have learned a lot of different activities as we have transitioned to proficiency. To further the profession, I want to share the best of these ideas with others. I am especially thinking of teachers who don’t have colleagues because their department is just them, teachers who are new to the profession or teachers who want to hone their skills. You will notice that I am publishing a video a month and these videos together are a forming a World Language Tool Box.

I am passionate about using songs as authentic documents to teach language. From this 20 minute video you will understand how I do this with intention and purpose to instruct language.

I share four ideas to use communication around songs:

  • Opinions and reactions
  • Story Scripts
  • Penguin stories
  • Lyrics as a reading

to make input comprehensible while using songs to motivate students.

Think about what you can make your own. Consider adding your next step in the comments to start a conversation with other teachers. I will be sharing about how to get students talking with art in my next video. Until next time!

Learn to leverage a language instruction circle in 20 minutes

By the end of this instructional video you will be able to:

  • Plan for a circle in your classroom using materials and ideas for activities ready-made for you
  • Build community in circle with your students
  • Engage in supported communication with you students

I first learned about the idea of the circle as community-building through Developmental Designs, a curriculum developed through a non-profit called The Origins Program. The method endorsed daily circles in homeroom or advisory. Using the circle as an approach to build community acknowledged that students can only learn when they feel safe in their relationships with teachers and other students. Developmental Designs tells us that relationship building doesn’t happen unless structures are put in place for it by teachers. Currently, many educators are using Restorative Justice circles. I found that when my students are familiar with sharing in a circle, there is a level of comfort that helps make it work in language class.

Using circle to promote language proficiency has a similar yet different intent. In the World Language community we hear from Stephen Krashen, a linguist, that language is best learned in low-anxiety environments. The community building brought about by circle facilitates trust and feelings of safety. Later, through the work of Darcy Rogers and the rest of the team at Organic World Language (OWL), I saw World Language best practices added to the circle, for example using the target language for instruction. Since OWL started giving workshops in 2009, I have seen other language teachers take the circle and make it their own. There is a lot of support out there for you to build your own practice of a language learning circle. My goal is to get you started and then hooked and next leveraging your own circle!

Learn to do Movie Talk in 20 minutes

I am starting a new series called “Learn to in 20 minutes”. In this series I am going to give teachers like you instruction for how to use different techniques in language instruction. This first installment is on Movie Talk. I have found that there are many teachers who want to learn this technique that they may have heard about from others. I hope you feel like I keep my word and truly teach Movie Talk in 20 minutes.

 

Please join the learning by entering a comment here on the Blog. Tell my readers how you use Movie Talk or tell us what you like about Movie Talk. Thank you!