The 10 Best French Short Videos for Picture Talk or Movie Talk

Picture Talk, or Movie Talk, is gaining momentum in our World Language community. I have blogged on this technique that is an extension of TPRS storytelling, or in my layman’s terms a great way to deliver language input in the novice high to intermediate low classroom. I like that the teacher uses pictures to show the students what she is talking about. For me, it is a great way to present interesting language input and to get the class talking as they predict or create a story together.

Cupidon Movie Talk
Cupidon — ESMA Movies

I am slowly building a library of short videos connected to themes that are frequently taught in beginning French. Here are some videos to add to your collection, with their corresponding themes:

Rhapsodie pour un pot-au-feu— Les activités
Simon, Je veux pas aller à l’école— L’école
Les Sisters, Doudou La Chance— La maison idéale
SamSam, Une journée crocochemardesque— La routine de la journée
Les Sisters, Telle soeur, telle soeur— Qu’est-ce que les jeunes font en été?
Lait Drôle de la Vie— La rentrée
Cupidon— Ma ville
L’or bleu— L’environnement
Au fil de l’âge— La famille
Le cadeau— Les animaux domestiques

When you first get started with Picture Talk, it helps to use the videos and resources that more experienced teachers have found. It saves you a lot of time and you can get right to using them in the classroom. IFprofs is a platform for sharing French education resources and there is a page on movie talks that has linked videos and other resources, like the slides. You will have to sign in to access it. I especially liked two videos that I found on IFProfs and am now using them, so you will notice I left two for others to use. I always consider giving back to others by sharing!

Music to share with students

We are back to school and I am trying to connect with my students and one way is through music. I play music for them because I believe it is a way to understand culture better, but even without that I would share music because I think it is powerful to use the arts in teaching.

Here are some relatively new songs that I will be sharing with my 8th graders this year:

Soprano – À la vie à l’amour
Bénabar – Feu de joie
Bigflo et Oli – Dommage
OrelSan – La pluie (avec Stromae)
Lou – A mon âge
Nassi – Rêves de Gamin
Keen’ V – Tu Réalises
Angèle – La Loi de Murphy

There are other songs that I incorporate in teaching for language input. These songs here, on the other hand, I will use for the class to listen to and comment on. I am hoping that students can talk about their opinion of the music, message and the video. If you are looking for ideas on how to do that, a great resource is the files from Mercredi Musique on Facebook, especially the one that is called the same name “Musique Mercredi”.

 

A roadmap for a proficiency-based unit: My go-to activities

Five months ago a teacher I am continuously inspired by named Rebecca Blouwolff asked for our top-ten go-tos in a proficiency-based lesson. I am finally ready to answer on behalf of me and my colleagues, Jess Levasseur and Heather Pineault. Here are our favorite activities that we use in our thematic units. For me, this is a timely post because I have been asked by a couple first-year teachers who are starting next week what exactly happens in a proficiency-based classroom.

You can find all of the resources in this folder as well as linked below. As Rebecca asked for in her post and subsequent Twitter challenge, these activities give students repetition without the activities being repetitive, get them moving, and push them to use language motivated by a strong intent.

  1. We usually start the unit with a hook video. With this video we are asking students to activate prior knowledge on a topic and to get excited about the theme. For all of my examples, I am going to use the theme of the environment. This video is the trailer for a movie called Demain. I first saw the video on the site TV5 Monde.
  2. The next activity we got from Rebecca and we call it Partner Vocabulary Definitions. Students memorize their word or definition, and leave it at their seat.
    green grass field under white clouds
    Photo by Scott Webb on Pexels.com

    They then look for the partner who has the corresponding word or definition by discussing theirs with their classmates. I am happy for another activity that gets students moving and interacting.

  3. I use a multi-column chart to have students think about the vocabulary and sort it. Have the students brainstorm anything they can in French to fit into the categories.
    This is one of many chances to interact with the terms of the unit. Another way to use a chart is when reading an article in order to pull out vocabulary on the theme, like this one here that works this article.
  4. The bulk of the input happens through authentic documents. Students read infographics and articles, watch videos, read picture books and listen to songs. Students do a comprehension guide for these, like the one I made for the song. (The infographic I linked leads to the interview interpersonal activity in number five.) I feel like we are creating a great collection of accessible readings and videos for our students and can post them to our school management system so students can take a second look outside of class.
  5. Students are asked to do interpersonal activities using the input from the authentic documents. I always rely on Lisa Shepard’s blog for interpersonal activities. This time I made two my own based on her work. One is an interview and the other is a graphic organizer to compare partners’ habits. We are always trying to get students to communicate with a purpose.
  6. We first learned Question – Question – Exchange from Creative Language Class and ever since it has been a pillar of our units as it is the moment where my students get the most chances to speak from their own point of view.
  7. I have my colleague Jess Levasseur to thank for the game Spoons. Students sit facing each other with a Spoon between them. If the teacher reads a statement that is true, the students compete to be the first to grab the spoon and win a point.
  8. And I am equally appreciative to my colleague Heather Pineault who has us playing Circonlocution every unit. In this game students use circonlocution and gestures to get the group to guess the list of words.
  9. This next one goes under repetition without being repetitive. In every unit we play a Kahoot game, which really just takes ten minutes. It is yet another way to see the material again.
  10. And I will finish with yet another way to spiral back on the material a final time, a Jeopardy game made on the Factile site.

I leave you with my top-ten go-to activities.

Jeopardy: Large-group Games using Technology

As I have come to understand proficiency-based instruction, my games have become so much more interesting for students. In my current Jeopardy games, students are doing a guessing game from a clue. My clues use circumlocution to talk around the terms and lead students to the answer.

There are a few choices for large-group games on the Internet and Jeopardy is the one I like best. When students tell me they love Quizlet Live and Kahoot they aren’t expressing interest in the content of the game, they just like pushing the buttons. Quizlet Live is most often played as an identification game. The students give the term to name what they see. I know it can be played with a clue and an answer, but the site is set up in a way that promotes an identification game. Kahoot, while sometimes used in the same way, is conceived to be a game where students pick the right answer to a question. As an example, here is my best attempt on the theme of Daily Routine. An ok game, but still like a language exercise.

So where am I going with this? The game Jeopardy offers a format which is more of a guessing game, and, there is a great online technology tool to make these games.

coconut tree
Photo by Steshka Willems on Pexels.com

With the platform Fractile, I am able to make a true guessing game. See my game on Tourism in Martinique linked at the bottom of this page.

Factile has options that make Jeopardy better than the versions I have created in the past. You can have multiple teams playing, not just two, which keeps students more engaged. Also, there is a flashcard mode that I like to use to review material with my students before we play which seems to get them to pay close attention.

As you can tell, I have enjoyed playing Jeopardy with my students. I find that it can be a true guessing game that engages students, as opposed to a stilted language-learning game. And, with the technology tool Fractile, I can have students play in small teams and we can review before the game using the flash card feature. Another feature that you may enjoy from Fractile is that you can play my games as they are for free or you can make a copy if you join the site and edit my games to make them work for your class.

Tourisme en Martinique

Ma Ville

L’Environnement

Teaching Film in the proficiency-based classroom: Belle et Sébastien

When I teach students French through film, I follow my regular World Language teaching rules: make the task accessible, limit the length of video clips, and everything we do prioritizes speaking and leads to discussion. I am going to walk you through how I do this referring to the film Belle et Sébastien. You will find all of my resources in this folder.

I have come to learn that when the language in the dialogue of a film is difficult, I can have students comment on the action and this works particularly well if you chose a film with a lot of action. While students are watching the film, they respond to statements as true or false and they have questions to guide their comprehension. See the handouts for during the film: 1 2 3 4 5

Using only short segments of a movie at a time allows me to use the rest of the class to explain culture, the historical setting of the film or to have the students do activities that help them understand the film. You will see how I did this in the teaching slides that go with the film.

As I said above, everything we do in French class prioritizes speaking and leads to a class discussion. After each segment, students respond to questions in pairs doing a Partner Turn and Talk. Students get many chances to speak each class because they are put into pairs for conversations. And, when doing this work in pairs, they prepare their thoughts for the class discussion that follows.

As a last point, I wanted to share that we studied this film after my students had already done a unit on World War II in their Social Studies class. It felt good to me to be able to reinforce what they had already learned.

It is my hope that through the examples that I have offered you can see some news ideas on how to use film to teach in the Proficiency-Based classroom. Please respond in a comment to tell me what parts of this lesson work for you or what you would include in a lesson on film. It would make me so happy to hear from each person who gets something out of this post.

Mini-Unit: Coupe du Monde 2018

Would you like to join my students and me for a mini-unit on the World Cup? I am planning to start one day ahead of the first game which is on Thursday, June 14th. This folder has all the resources.

Start with a video to pull the students into the excitement. Here is an ad Fiers d’être bleus for the World Cup. This isn’t about language input, but instead about setting up the big idea for these lessons. Later in the unit keep the excitement going with this Coca-Cola ad.

And, here are the Can Do’s:

  • I can talk about an individual’s country of origin and nationality.
  • I can talk about who is the best athlete and why.
  • I can give details about the 2018 World Cup.
  • I can understand the lyrics of a World Cup song.
  • I can talk about the social responsibility of sports.

Now let’s get started with activities for novice high to intermediate low students. My students will choose one of the teams and work in groups to make a slide with a picture of the team, name of the country and the nationality of the players and highlight a top player, describing him. From the site Livre de Sepienta you will find the following handouts for each team:

  • Présentation pays coupe du monde (1-4)
  • Carte nomenclature équipes foot coupe du monde 2018

Print each of these in color, cut and distribute to groups. And here are some good photos of the teams for students to include in their slides. When students have completed their slides they can present them to the class. This is an opportunity for students to talk about countries and nationalities and top athletes.

At this point you may want to have students practice the names of the countries who participate in the World Cup with this Quizlet Coupe du monde 2018– pays.  Ask students to begin by using the flashcards and then playing Match as homework. Next class students can compete at Quizlet Live. Later in the unit students can do the same with another Quizlet called Coupe du Monde. Before they play, pass out to them the Picture Dictionary Coupe du Monde.

Then, starting on June 15th, the day after the first game, students will fill out the table with scores as games are played and discussed in class. Here is the schedule to print and hang in the room. How many games you discuss depends on how long into June your school goes. We go late!

On the Enseignons.be site I found a good reading called Coupe du monde 2018 that includes two activities. Students will write in names of countries under the heading of the correct continent and will match descriptions of mascots with the pictures. From this reading students have the content to give details about the World Cup. This will be, in my classroom, the opportunity to practice questions and answers with students.

Who are the famous people who will play? Who would you give the best player prize to? I chose a few videos of some of the famous players. Students discuss the one they would choose as the best player and explain why. I used this article as my resource and made this slide show.

While you are viewing the slide show linked above, take note that I have included two activities, Circonlocution and Maître d’. Use these as ten minute warm ups in class to get students speaking. Also to start class, note that I have slides with the latest scores and pictures in Actualités de la Coupe du Monde. Use the scores to discuss and fill out the Tableau Mondial. Use the pictures for partner turn and talk discussions.

The singer Tal has a song for the World Cup called Mondial. Find the video here. And, Black M has made the official video for Senegal. Students are asked to read the lyrics in pairs and watch the video and complete a Song Analysis, from Mercredi Musique. Or, here is an activity to do with Gainde.

For homework during this unit, I have a Google Form Coupe du Monde reading that I made with an infographic from 1jour1actu. And, I found an EdPuzzle made by another teacher, Quels pays participent à la coupe du monde. You may consider assigning either of the Quizlet sets for homework too. I ask students to do the Learn game until they reach 100%.

Our next activity is a competition in teams to solve math word problems about soccer in French. The questions are in this document Défi Foot. Cut out the questions and stack in the middle of the team. They turn one over and start and as they finish each question, they pick a new one and continue. Answers are submitted to the teacher to determine who has the most number right in the quickest amount of time.

And finally I will have the students make a Coupe du Monde Review Game to review vocabulary and I will discuss with the students Inequality and the World Cup. Here is a Slide Presentation (that I edited from Oxfam and translated) which pairs well with readings on soccer players who have acted for change called Foot rebelle— in my class we will read about Drogba and Socrates. In order to talk about what regular citizens like our students can do for change, you may want to talk about Malala and have students do this reading or you can have them view this video.

If you get a chance to go outside with your students, here are some community building games to play outside in the target language. At my school the last few days start to feel more casual as many students go off to camp. These games are a way to enjoy ourselves when we aren’t really doing curriculum any longer:

1. Le Beret Two teams of an equal number of players line up facing each other about ten meters apart. Give each player a number on one team and then repeat the same number to give each player a number on the other team. A ball (the béret) is placed in the middle. The teacher calls out two numbers and the students with those numbers race to grab the béret and run back to their own line without being tagged by the player from the opposite team. If they are tagged they join the other team.

2. Les nations (also known as Spud) Each player decides what country to be. We go around the group with the players sharing what country they are. One person starts with the ball in the center of the bunch. At the beginning of each round, the person with the ball (who is in the center of the bunch) throws the ball upwards to the sky while yelling a country. Everyone disperses and runs in all different directions away from the bunch except for the person who was called. That person catches the ball and then yells “Stop” (in the target language.) When he or she yells this, everyone must freeze. The person with the ball then is allowed to take three giant steps toward any player. He or she throws the ball and tries to hit someone. To dodge, players are allowed to move all parts of their body except they may not move their feet at all. If a player is hit for the first time, he or she loses the right to one of the three steps. The person who was hit becomes the new thrower; otherwise, the thrower who missed loses the right to a step. The next round begins and play continues.

3. Avez-vous vu mon extraterrestre? (A variation on Duck, Duck Goose) Students are seated in a circle sitting down. One player walks along the outside of the circle asking, Have you seen my extraterrestrial? That player describes one of the sitting students by the color of his hair or eyes, clothes, physical or personality characteristics or what he likes. Once the player recognizes that he is being described, he must run after the player who described him until he gets back to his place. If he is tagged, he must sit in the center of the circle.

And you can end the instruction with a Kahoot quiz Coupe du Monde 2018. As for assessment, I like to record students using Voicethread. I don’t know if you will be able to access the one I made here, please let me know if it works. If not, I used the picture below and gave a prompt for the students to record:

“This is a picture of the French goalie saving a goal in the game against Australia. In French, say as much as you can about the World Cup. Consider including:

  • The name of the event, the World Cup, and details you know about it.
  • Who the teams are who are playing. What the nickname is for the French team.
  • What group they are in.
  • Who you see in the photo, i.e. players and a goalie.
  • What they are doing.
  • Invent details you don’t know. The score of the game, who won and who played well.
  • Talk about a famous French player on the team.”

Lloris

I hope you will have fun with your students with this end of the year mini-unit!

Building Relationships between language teachers

Some language teachers are the only one or one of a few in their building. Other language teachers have a department to rely on, but may be in a different place in their professional development than their colleagues. I have a great colleague who I talk to every day and in years past I planned with a colleague on a regular basis. Whatever your situation, we can all benefit from building relationships with other language teachers. I am going to address building relationships outside of your own district by joining your state’s professional development organization, forming a professional learning group and creating an online presence.

I hope you have already joined your state’s professional development organization. In Massachusetts ours is Massachusetts Foreign Language Association and like most of them nationally, we have a newsletter, online site, workshops and annual conference. Over the years of attending the annual conference, I have come to know other language teachers who I have interacted with outside of the conference from time to time.

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Vegetable in the médina in Rabat, Alexndra LeComte

But for me the best thing to happen was that I joined the board of directors last year. Serving on the board, volunteering at the conference and presenting at the conference have put me in touch with dynamic teachers across the state. You can volunteer and present at the annual conference without joining the board yet consider applying to get to know other language teachers and administrators.

It is important to realize that sometimes you need to take the first step to bring people together instead of waiting for others to contact you. Be confident. Even those teachers who in your eyes may be stronger or further on the journey most likely would appreciate joining a professional learning group. My experience was that all I had to do was ask and a group of talented educators was happy to come together once every two months to discuss new strategies, articles, adopting a standards-based grading system and discuss chapters of a useful book. In my group there is a French teacher who presents nationally, a department head and other teachers like me who are still finding their way.

If you are reading this blog, you are seeing me model a strategy that I would advise to other teachers, create an online presence. There is an online community who is out there gathering ideas from blogs. I have only 23 followers. Some of my posts have been read by over three hundred people, but not all. The most popular are the ones that are ready-to-use ideas. I am not bothered that my circle isn’t large as I am continuing to build it. The easiest way to start an online presence is on Twitter. I retweet authentic documents that can be useful in instruction and on occasion take a picture of something my students produced and post it. I also use Twitter to encourage others to read my latest blog posts. I have only two hundred followers, so I use hashtags to widen my audience, like #langchat, #fle and #authres. Online relationships have served me well. I have asked for help on Twitter and received it. I even had a teacher I never met revise my presentation for a conference. There is a Facebook page called Musique Mercredi where I have received new ideas and activities as well as posted some of my own. I may never meet in person any of the members of my online community, but relationships with them have been valuable.

We are social beings and learn great things from others. I encourage you to build relationships with other language teachers.