Music to share with students

We are back to school and I am trying to connect with my students and one way is through music. I play music for them because I believe it is a way to understand culture better, but even without that I would share music because I think it is powerful to use the arts in teaching.

Here are some relatively new songs that I will be sharing with my 8th graders this year:

Soprano – À la vie à l’amour
Bénabar – Feu de joie
Bigflo et Oli – Dommage
OrelSan – La pluie (avec Stromae)
Lou – A mon âge
Nassi – Rêves de Gamin
Keen’ V – Tu Réalises
Angèle – La Loi de Murphy

There are other songs that I incorporate in teaching for language input. These songs here, on the other hand, I will use for the class to listen to and comment on. I am hoping that students can talk about their opinion of the music, message and the video. If you are looking for ideas on how to do that, a great resource is the files from Mercredi Musique on Facebook, especially the one that is called the same name “Musique Mercredi”.

 

Teaching language through songs: Reacting to the music

Current practice for teaching language using songs seems to be word clouds and cloze activities. A word cloud is a jumble of words and the student circles the words that are heard in the song. This is a solid listening activity as are cloze activities, where the students fill in the missing words in the song lyrics. I have used both strategies to help give my students something to support them as they listen to songs that otherwise might be overwhelming. I also see teachers use a song to give students examples of grammar to then have an indirect lesson on grammar. I am also a fan of this approach where you guide students to examples of the grammar structure, have them deduce the rules then ask them to do a writing assignment that has students using the grammar without implicitly asking for it, perhaps in the form of an Exit ticket.

For me yet a new way of teaching using songs is emerging. As I’ve mentioned on these pages before, TV5 Monde’s Paroles des clips is an excellent source for activities to use with songs in the classroom. Two of my favorite examples are On écrit sur les murs by Kids United and Cette Anée là by M. Pokora. As these are activities that are pushing into new territory, let’s see what we can gather from them. In Cette Année Là, students are asked to react to the song by giving their opinion, which is spot on for the proficiency-based classroom. I decided to adopt this kind of activity and use it for other songs, like Frérot and Le Plus Fort du Monde both by Black M.. I wrote the linked handouts with the help of my colleague Heather Pineault. We still use cloze activities as well and another new-to-us idea is to have students comment on what they see, like you will see in the activity I made for the song Papa by Bigflo et Oli. And a final technique we incorporate to use songs to further communication is to have students understand a structure in a song and then make it their own by doing a short writing assignment about something personal to them using the structure. You see an example of that in the activity for Le Plus Fort du Monde where students then write about their own family members.

Activities that ask students to identify words, while a good way to have them focus their listening, don’t give a chance for the same level of communication as activities that ask students to react to the song, give one’s opinion, talk about what they see and write about oneself.

My students’ favorite French music

My Level 1 French students have songs to recommend.  These are songs where they like the tune and we have listened to them a few times since I introduced them.  The first time I play the song we do Interpretive activities, which you will find below.  Later we listen to the songs while we are working.

Most of these songs I found on TV5 Monde’s Paroles de Clips.   The site has music videos for teaching French and activities which are leveled.  I have found the offerings to be current and carefully chosen.  I collect appropriate French music for teaching on a Music Video Board on Pinterest.

220px-Elle_Me_Dit_Mika

We watch the video as we listen to the song, because the visual gives context and for that reason I especially like videos that tell the story of the song.  Seeing that I teach 7th and 8th graders, the song’s lyrics and its video has to be appropriate for that age.  I have a native speaker at each grade level, so I can’t get away with anything!

Elle me dit de Mika     Activity: Elle me dit

Papaoutai de Stromae     Activity: Papaoutai

En été de La reine des neiges     Activity: En été

Rien à vous dire de Jérôme Minière     Activity: Rien a vous dire

La Seine de Vanessa Paradis et M     Activity: La Seine